CHANGING

BEHAVIOUR

USING A

VISUAL CUE

BINFORGREENSEAS 

BECAUSE THE SEAS HAVE NO BOUNDARIES

AWARENESS THROUGH

 EDUCATION

GreenSeas Founder Gets

 State Award

thin

A marine conservation charity




stopping plastics entering the seas

The Problem

Marine plastic pollution occurs from the misconception of:

It’s only one piece of plastic, what harm can it do?

The sea is vast, rubbish will not affect it adversely.

My life is not affected by plastics in the oceans.

Climate change has nothing to do with marine plastics.

The Reality

But the truth of the matter is:

There is over 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic in the sea and counting.

Plastics are in the food chain!

1/3 of all fish caught off UK shores have plastics in them.

Seafood eaters ingest up to 11,000 tiny pieces of plastic every year with dozens of particles becoming embedded in human tissues.

The degradation and breakdown of plastic represents a previously unrecognized source of greenhouse gases.

Current Locations

A Solution

The BinForGreenSeas is a recycling bin for plastics

The striking colours, height, emotive tagline and shape of the

BinForGreenSeas is designed to act on two levels – direct and subconscious.

Practical in its objective, its also provides strong visual triggers that stimulates the electrochemical signals transmitted to the brain delivering the message; when disposing rubbish, using any bin will protect marine life.


Testimonials

LATEST NEWS

The Lord Mayor of London cuts the ribbon on new BinForGreenSeas at Canary Wharf pier


The financial capital of London sees a new addition to its

promenade.

See more

Portishead is next for

a BinForGreenSeas


This nautical town with its large marina will be the siting

a BinForGreenSeas this summer.

BLOG

From Source to Sea: The journey of plastics

Plastic pollution transported by rivers could make up 70% – 80% of the plastics that are found within the marine environment. Rivers act like a huge conveyor belt, talking our waste from the cities and inland areas, all the way out into the oceans.


In 1992 a shipment containing 28,000 rubber ducks fell into the Pacific Ocean. It highlighted the great distances pollution can travel once it enters the big blue.


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